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Forza Horizon 4 Set In Britain, Releasing October 2

For six years in a row Microsoft and Turn 10 studios has been releasing a new Forza game once a year with tick-tock precision. New cars, new settings, and improved graphics are all part of the expected main course, but the unexpected desserts are what keep millions of video game fans returning for seconds.

Chief among its new set of features is its synced weather system. You and up to 71 other players roaming around UK roads will experience shifting conditions from dry to wet to snow and ice all at the same time. Planning activities in your instance is also easier with a new race route planning feature.

Technically, Forza Horizon 4 has all the bells and whistles. Turn 10 claims a roster greater than 450 cars from over 100 different manufacturers, and players are now offered the ability to customize their in game driver with clothing and emotes.

Forza Horizon 4 is set to be released October 2nd on Xbox One and PC. People who purchase the Ultimate Edition may start early access on September 28, 2018.


The cover car for Forza Horizon 4 is the 2018 McLaren Senna - a juiced up version of the McLaren 720S. Limited to just 500 cars, the Senna packs an M840TR twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8 producing 789 horsepower and 590 lb-ft of torque. Its pure carbon fiber body weighs only 2,641 lbs (1,198 kg). The engine is paired with a 7-speed dual clutch transmission which powers the rear wheels only. At each corner, the Senna is equipped with carbon ceramic brakes, center locking wheels, and Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R tires.

For chassis control, McLaren added active hydraulic dampers that removes the need for an anti-roll bar, roof mounted air intake plenum because it sounds good, active carbon fiber rear wing, active front aero, and a double rear diffuser for huge ground sucking effects. Each McLaren Senna starts at £750,000 and is hand-built in Surrey, England. A perfect model to showcase the brilliance of British engineering.